Foro DINASTÍAS | La Realeza a Través de los Siglos.

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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 11 Ago 2020 12:01 
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Vídeo publicado en el canal oficial de la monarquía maorí sobre la reina Te Atairangikaahu:

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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 11 Ago 2020 12:15 
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Publicación del 22 de mayo en recuerdo por la coronación de la reina Te Atairangikaahu.



"#IteeneiRaa 23 May 1966

Coronation of first Maaori Queen, Te Arikinui Dame Te Atairangikaahu.

Princess Piki, the daughter of King Koroki, was chosen to become the first Maaori Queen during her father’s funeral, in accordance with Kiingitanga protocol.

She assumed her mother’s name, Te Atairangikaahu. She served as queen for 40 years, the longest of any Maaori monarch.
To commemorate her coronation day and to pay homage to the special connection Ngaati Pikiao has to the Whare Ariki o Te Wherowhero, Ngaati Pikiao host their annual Poukai.
#FINAL Karakia Paimaarire Live tomorrow Sunday May 24 at 7pm. We remember the Raa Koroneihana of Te Arikinui Te Atairangikaahu.
#ToituuTeKiingitanga #162years"


Como curiosidad recuerdan que al ser proclamada asumió el nombre de su madre.


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 11 Ago 2020 12:16 
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Publicación del 22 de mayo de 2019 en recuerdo por la coronación de la reina Te Atairangikaahu.



"Coronation of first Maaori Queen, Te Arikinui Dame Te Atairangikaahu.
Princess Piki, the daughter of King Koroki, was chosen to become the first Maaori Queen during her father’s funeral, in accordance with Kiingitanga protocol.
She assumed her mother’s name, Te Atairangikaahu."


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 11 Ago 2020 12:26 
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He de decir que todas las imágenes que he puesto aquí de la reina Te Atairangikaahu me transmiten mucha serenidad y simpatía.


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 13 Ago 2020 11:37 
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Tūheitia Potatau Te Wherowhero VII era el hijo mayor de la anterior reina. Nació el 21 de abril de 1955 y fue coronado el 21 de agosto de 2006. LLeva, por tanto, 14 años en el cargo. Cuando su madre falleció, los dos principales candidatos a sucederla en el trono fueron su dos hijos mayores, Tūheitia Potatau Te Wherowhero VII y su hermana Heeni Katipa aunque finalmente el elegido fue él.

Fue educado en la Rakaumanga School en Huntly, en la Southwell School en Hamilton, y en el St Stephen's College en Bombay Hills.

El 27 de noviembre de 2007, fue nombrado Oficial de la Orden de San Juan,2​ de la que posteriormente pasó a ser caballero. En 2008 fue nombrado Caballero Gran Cruz de la Real Orden de la Corona de Tonga. En 2010 fue nombrado comendador de la Orden de San Lázaro. En 2016 recibió el máximo honor de la ciudad de Hamilton, the Freedom of the City y en el mismo año recibió un doctorado honorífico por las Universidad de Waikato.

Se casó con Makau Ariki Atawhai y tienen tres hijos: Te Ariki Tamaroa Whatumoana, Te Ariki Taituruki Korotangi y Puhi Ariki Ngawaihonoitepo.

*Makau Ariki se traduce como consorte real.

Además de su Consejo Consultivo, en 2012 estableció también el Consejo Espiritual (Te Kāhui Wairua) que está formado por miembros de la iglesia metodista, presbiteriana, anglicana, católica, ratana y paimārire y ringatu.

La consorte real fue nombrada patrona de the Māori Women's Welfare League en 2007 y del Te Kohao Health.

El rey y la consorte real:
Imagen

El rey y el papa Francisco:
Imagen

El rey, el príncipe de Gales y la duquesa de Cornualles:
Imagen


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 13 Ago 2020 11:46 
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En 2010 hubo cierta polémica por el uso que hacía el rey de los fondos tribales (el dinero del Kiingitanga) y el nombramiento del director de la compañía que gestiona los fondos (Ururangi Ltd) y amenazó con abdicar.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/3393749 ... o-abdicate

Maori King threatens to abdicate.
By KARLA AKUHATA
12:26, Mar 02 2010


The Maori King has threatened to abdicate his title if tribal members do not fall back into line.

According to several sources King Tuheitia turned up to a meeting of the tribe's parliament, Te Kauhanganui, on Sunday and in a surprise move delivered an emotional speech.

The sources said during his speech the king blasted Te Kauhanganui members for questioning his use of tribal funds, which he called "his money", and the appointment of John "Barna" Heremia and Taitimu Maipi as the directors of the company which receives money from the tribe to operate his office.

The company, Ururangi Ltd, receives an annual budget of $1.2 million for the office and the appointments had been criticised after it was revealed that Mr Heremia and Mr Maipi were the two men at the helm of a Huntly kura kaupapa singled out by the auditor-general for making $400,000 in undeclared payments to its principal.

Mr Heremia is the principal of the school and Mr Maipi is the chairman of the board of trustees.

One of the sources said King Tuheitia spoke for about 20 minutes and it was clear that he was frustrated and angry.

"He wants control of his office without any question. He blames Te Kauhanganui for the issues that have been raised and he is embarrassed by Te Kauhanganui and just wants to do it his way.

"He wants it all to stop and basically said that if this doesn't happen he would step down from being the paramount chief of this tribe and the Maori king."

The source said several members of Te Kauhanganui were sympathetic to the king, with many saying they felt sorry for him that he felt he had to make such a speech.

Attempts by the Waikato Times to contact the king's office and board chairman Tukoroirangi Morgan for comment went unanswered.

King Tuheitia is the seventh Maori monarch and is a direct descendant of the first Maori King, Potatau, who was elected by several iwi to unite Maori. The Waikato-Tainui tribe has been the caretaker of the Kingitanga movement for more than 150 years.

Another source said King Tuheitia also demanded that the tribe put a stop to attacks on the executive board, Te Arataura.

"He called it his board and said that the tribe was to stop their attacks on his board."

The source said he believed, though, that the board should be working on behalf of the tribe.

The board has been criticised by some tribal members following its decision to incur significant legal fees defending a claim of unfair dismissal by chief executive Hemi Rau, approval of a $100,000 success fee paid to each negotiator of the Waikato River claim and a continuing rise in the cost of governance. The board comprises 10 people elected from Te Kauhanganui and one member elected by the king.


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 13 Ago 2020 11:51 
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Reunión del rey Tūheitia Potatau Te Wherowhero VII y el príncipe de Gales:

https://thespinoff.co.nz/books/03-04-20 ... aruawahia/

Prince Charles, meet King Tūheitia Paki of Ngāruawāhia.
Steve Braunias reviews a new biography of Prince Charles by way of wondering when a full account will ever be given about New Zealand’s royal family and the kiingitanga.

One of the great forbidden stories of New Zealand journalism is a portrait of the court of King Tūheitia Paki. It’s not exactly open government at Tūrangawaewae, the kiingitanga seat at Ngāruawāhia. “It’s got nothing to do with you. We’re working through it ourselves,” Waikato-Tainui chief executive Donna Flavell scolded Herald reporter Matt Nippert in September last year, when he began following the King’s money. Nippert tracked down a report by the Charities Services which investigated possible mismanagement of funds. He wrote, “That report, obtained by the Weekend Herald, detailed the King’s $350,000 annual salary and raised concerns about 114 transactions between 2012 and 2014 totalling $120,691, relating to the purchase of jewellery, clothing and beauty treatments and almost $90,000 in cash withdrawals.”

There was a follow-up story published in the Herald on Sunday at Easter. “This took a long time, and a lot of legwork, to get over the line,” Nippert noted on his Twitter account, linking to his story about a “mysterious $46,000 invoice for weight-loss surgery”. From his front-page scoop: “Exactly who had the expensive procedure done privately at Auckland’s MercyAscot hospital, paid for out of a Tainui Group Holdings fund dedicated to the healthcare of King Tūheitia Paki, is unknown.” Who, exactly, was The Thin Man? Helpfully, there was film of Nippert and his famous brown suit at Auckland airport’s domestic arrivals gate, interviewing the King’s principal secretary, Rangi Whakaruru, described as “trim-looking”. Yes, said Whakaruru, he had gastric band surgery. No, he said, he knew nothing about a “mysterious $46,000 invoice”. Nippert wrote, “Whakaruru, who is paid an annual salary of more than $200,000 from the charity handling the King’s affairs, denied it related to his own treatment.”

The key line in the story: “Whakaruru has been a close confidante to King Tūheitia since 2009.” Close confidante, principal secretary, advisor – now we’re talking. In almost every monarchy, it’s the king or queen’s courtiers who are the ones to watch. They are the powers behind the throne, the influencers, with their urgings and promptings and various assorted maneuverings. In New Zealand, their activities are as covert as the royal family. King Tūheitia Paki operates behind a veil of silence; the media is rarely granted access. We know that his health is bad. He keeps a low profile. This pithy assessment in a 2011 Herald story may or may not be an accurate measure of his stature: “A former truck driver who is a rugby league lover and kapa haka fan, he mows his own lawns.” His eldest son Whatumoana Paki takes on many of his father’s duties. His younger son Korotangi is invisible, a preferable state of affairs to his shabby media appearances in 2014, best summarised in this haunting sentence from Stuff: “Paki, supported in court by his heavily pregnant girlfriend, pleaded guilty to all charges arising from the theft of two surfboards from Waikanae Motor Camp.”

But that was four years ago. Leave the “Prince” to get on with his private life. King Tūheitia’s advisers are fair game for scrutiny, especially considering the quality of some of their advice. Their decision to say thanks but no thanks to a visit from Prince William and Princess Kate during the 2014 royal visit was widely viewed as ungracious. On the other hand, that view was widely promoted by John Key. Newspaper report, London’s Daily Telegraph: “Mr Key said King Tūheitia’s advisors told officials at Kensington Palace that ‘if you can’t make it longer than 90 minutes, then don’t come.’ Mr Key said, ‘It’s a matter for them to decide their own thing, but in the end [Prince William] has a fairly tight timetable. I would have thought [90 minutes] was quite generous.’”

He might have had a point there. At any rate, the royal visit was a minor and innocuous matter. More seriously, the King spurned Labour at last year’s election and backed the Māori Party. King Tūheitia signalled his intentions at a speech in Tūrangawaewae in August 2016. The eternally hapless Labour leader Andrew Little didn’t see it coming. Jo Moir, Stuff: “On Sunday at Tūheitia’s speech Little was sat only metres away from where the King delivered his attack on the party. However a last minute heads-up about what was about to go down meant Little got thrown in a golf cart before the grenades started flying.” King Tūheitia later went on to endorse Māori Party candidate, Rahui Papa, in the Hauraki-Waikato seat over his own niece, Nanaia Mahuta. It didn’t work out too well. Outside of the Waikato, kiingitanga is often seen as an obscure construct, a historic curio, with limited influence. Ngāpuhi leader David Rankin scorned Tūheitia when he said, “As far as the Government is concerned, they have no right to use the term ‘Māori King’. Tūheitia could be called the King of Huntly, perhaps. I could live with that.” The 2017 election results suggested that kīngitanga has limited influence within the Waikato: Mahuta gave Papa a hiding at the polls, and increased her majority.

Was the whole thing King Tūheitia’s idea, his own doing, or was he acting on advice? Both Labour and New Zealand First pointed the finger at that brown eminence, Tukoroirangi Morgan, the former Māori Party president, who was forever described as “one of Tūheitia’s closest advisors”. Morgan has since stepped down. Tuariki Delamere replaced Morgan as the King’s “political advisor” in January, and pledged that the kiingitanga would give its “unconditional support” to Jacinda Ardern’s Labour-led government. Advisors, principal secretaries, close confidantes….From whence do they come from? Who are all the King’s men? Is it entirely a formal arrangement, within the King’s 12-person council, Tekau-mā-rua, or is it sometimes informal? What goes on behind the scenes?

There was a fascinating glimpse inside the King’s “inner circle” on Native Affairs in 2015. The show’s reporter Maiki Sherman spoke with Morgan, and Te Kaumaru leader Te Kahautu Maxwell, a very thoughtful man who shared interesting views on the King’s apparent divinity. You have to wonder what else he thinks and what he brings to the table. But the programme was less than 12 minutes in length. A full picture of New Zealand’s royal family and its attendant courtiers awaits.

Strange to even think that we have an existing monarchy; it’s been around for 160 years, and has become an evidently wealthy enterprise, with its salary of $350,000 for King Tūheitia and $200,000 for his principal secretary. Matt Nippert’s instincts to follow the money have parted the curtain. Not everything that goes on in a royal court, though, is scandalous or mendacious. Auckland historian Paul Moon isn’t exactly seen as a friend to Māoridom – his 2008 book on cannibalism went down badly, and fellow AUT lecturer Hēmi Kelly attacked Moon’s 2018 book Killing Te Reo as “ridiculous” in the Spinoff – but he made valuable comments about kiingitanga in an interview with Elton Smallman, the excellent Māori affairs reporter at the Waikato Times. Moon said kiingitanga had a long and proud history and a “crucial role” to play in modern society: “This thing has a pedigree that goes back a long way… There is an accumulation of experience, there is an accumulation of wisdom and a lot of very, very committed people behind the king.”

There are a lot of people behind Prince Charles, too, advisors and confidantes of all stripes, padding noiselessly along the corridors at Balmoral and Clarence House and St James Palace, sycophants of empire, “people of power and influence employed in or with access to the inner sanctum of the rival royal courts”, as described on the back cover of Tom Bowers’s new book Rebel Prince: The Power, Passion and Defiance of Prince Charles. Its 350 pages are based on the low-hanging fruit of interviews with 120 such “people of power and influence”. When it comes to detailed information about the secret goings-on within the court of King Tūheitia Paki, the cupboard is pretty much bare; Rebel Prince is merely the latest vast outpouring of revelations about the way Charles conducts his affairs.

Much of the book is thick with the various assorted maneuverings of advisers. Bowers’s thesis is that Charles does things his own muddled and disastrous way, and ignores every single piece of good advice. He operates by caprice, whim, and arrogance. “Embraced today, a favourite can be cast out tomorrow. Like some feudal lord, he presides at the centre of a court with no place for democracy or dissenting views…He has refused to engage in debate. Advisers know that to say ‘No’ will simply prompt his search for a replacement who will say ‘Yes.’ Every decision is his and his alone.”

It seems plain that one of Bowers’s sources is Don McKinnon. In exchange for giving Bowers a one-sided version of his dealings with Charles when he served as Commonwealth secretary, he comes across as a man of vision and courage, and given the heroic soubriquet “the combative New Zealander”. McKinnon claims that he urged Charles’s advisers over and over that the Prince had to go out and actually visit Commonwealth countries other than Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. “The Commonwealth’s existence was in jeopardy,” Bowers states, blindly going along with McKinnon’s version. Charles went as far as meeting the high commissioners of Pacific countries at New Zealand House in London: “McKinnon was unimpressed by reports of the encounter.”

Later, Bowers writes, “Most Commonwealth countries, including New Zealand, disliked the prospect of Queen Camilla.” Again, is this McKinnon, whispering sweet nothings into Bowers’s ear? Anyone who trotted along on the royal tour of New Zealand in 2012 would have seen that their reception was warm, genuine, excited. True, there was only one family to meet them when they arrived in the country, at Whenuapai airport. Elisabeth Uele was watching the news at her home in West Harbour when she saw that Charles was about to arrive. She gathered her sister, visiting from America, and six of her nine children, and jumped in the car. Her kids posed for photos on police motorcycles. They were outnumbered by the diplomatic protection squad, who parked up in front of two cows in a yard, and threw invisible rugby balls at each other…But two days later, on Queen St, crowds lined up six-deep to welcome Charles and Camilla. It was a public ecstasy, something genuine and fond.

But this doesn’t fit the narrative as suggested by “the combative New Zealander”. One story in Rebel Prince, possibly real, possibly fabricated and self-serving, has McKinnon, that wild colonial, bold and true, telling it like it is to Charles’s lackeys: “Charles must do his bit!”

They meet him less than half-way. “We’ve been thinking,” they airily instruct McKinnon, “that he might visit Malta.”

The fools! Didn’t they know what was at stake? And who did they think they were talking to, anyway? McKinnon wasn’t the type to tug his forelock and back out of the room. McKinnon, according to Bowers, “snapped” at the lackeys: “Malta’s down the street. He needs to go further!”

Sadly, the response is the same as when McKinnon was deputy prime minister under Bolger: no one listened to him.

If only Prince Charles would heed the wise counsel of those like McKinnon, sighs Bowers, who affects to wring his hands with frustration. “As a committed monarchist, I want Charles to become king,” he writes. But: “His popularity, as I write in early 2018, remains disconcertingly low.” Well, it can always plummet lower, and Bowers does his best to present Charles in the worst possible light. There is fresh gossip and stale gossip and discredited gossip; Bowers drags out the old lie told by a valet of Princess Diana that he once saw Charles and his personal assistant Michael Fawcett “in the midst of a sexual act”. For balance, or something, he also drags out the one by a cop who wrote in his tawdry memoirs that Diana possessed a vibrator.

Rebel Prince, like any tell-all or tell-some, operates like one of those “You Won’t Believe What Tiger Woods’s Wife Looks Like Now” clickbait fillers that we consider ourselves too lofty to look at but find ourselves driving the arrows relentlessly forward in search of the next unpleasant image. Prince Charles is seen as a hothead and a cold fish, most often as a crackpot. “He sits for hours, and sometimes for a whole day, dressed in eccentric clothes in the garden.” He smashes dinner plates in a rage. He puts down his siblings: “I’m the Prince of Wales, and they’re not.” He puts down his sons. He communicates with his father by letter. He has Stephen Fry over to dinner; the appeal of that old phoney is that he’s “clever, funny, and endlessly flattering.” He has a man to squeeze the royal toothpaste and a man who carries his own personal lavatory seat on all his travels so that it may please his royal bum.

But it’s all the same thing. There’s no light and shade in Rebel Prince, only vindictive and embarrassing little leaves of gossip that swirl around Prince Charles but fail to illuminate the man inside. One of the few times he comes alive in the book is when Bowers presents two pieces of dialogue between Charles and Camilla.

The first reported exchange is during their affair.

Charles: “I need you several times a week.”

Camilla: “I need you all the week, all the time.”

The second reported exchange is more recently, and the setting has Charles at the bottom of the stairs, shouting up to Camilla, on their way to an official engagement.

Charles: “Come on, get a move on!”

Camilla: “Where are we going?”

Charles: “Haven’t you read the brief?”

The first, driven by lust and desire (although the “several” estimate is less than crazed); the second, a banal scene from a marriage. “Get a move on” – the appeal of husbands everywhere, impatient on the doorstep, looking at their watch, needing to go out somewhere when they’d probably rather stay in with the woman they love. For all his supposed eccentricities, there is an appealing ordinariness about Charles. Shy, awkward, funny, not especially clever, endlessly flattered…There can hardly be any mystery why he’s mad as a snake. When he was a toddler, he once paraded up and down the red carpet in the nursery corridor, wearing a red velvet Santa Claus cloak, and chanting, “I’m the King!” Not yet; his whole life he’s been waiting for his mother to die.


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 13 Ago 2020 11:55 
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http://www.teinteresa.es/gente/ray-maor ... 90983.html

El rey maorí de Nueva Zelanda rechazó reunirse con el príncipe Guillermo de Inglaterra y a su esposa Catalina por considerar insuficientes, para permitir una correcta observación del protocolo, los 90 minutos que los duques de Cambridge preveían dedicarle durante su visita al país.


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 14 Ago 2020 19:26 
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En esta publicación del Kiingitanga vemos a la hija del rey maorí

Te Puhi Ariki Ngawaihonoitepo
#ataahuaakenei



Imagen


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 14 Ago 2020 19:30 
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En esta publicación del 6 de enero de 2020 felicitan el trigésimo cumpleaños de su hijo mayor Te Ariki Tamaroa Whatumoana, al fondo se encuentra su madre, la consorte real.



Imagen


Última edición por deste el 14 Ago 2020 19:32, editado 1 vez en total

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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 14 Ago 2020 19:31 
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Imagen del rey maorí y su esposa la consorte real



Imagen


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 Asunto: Re: Monarquía MAORÍ
NotaPublicado: 14 Ago 2020 19:39 
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El hijo mayor del rey maorí Te Ariki Tamaroa Whatumoana con el príncipe de Gales y la duquesa de Cornualles.


Prince Charles, Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, and Te Ariki Tamaroa Whatumoana Te Aa arrive dressed in Korowai (traditional Maori woven cloak) during a visit to Turangawaewae Marae on November 8, 2015 in Ngaruawahia, New Zealand. The Royal couple are on a 12-day tour visiting seven regions in New Zealand and three states and one territory in Australia.

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